Kindle edition of ‘Strathclyde’

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age
My latest volume on early medieval Scottish history is now available as an e-book. The paperback was published a couple of months ago but many people now prefer digital editions so I’m posting the relevant Amazon links here.

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age (Kindle edition) – via Amazon UK or Amazon USA.

More information about the book, with a list of chapters, can be found in a blogpost on the paperback edition.

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Brunanburh in 937: Bromborough or Lanchester?

King Athelstan

Athelstan, king of the English (924-39), in a manuscript of Bede’s Life of St Cuthbert.


Last Thursday evening (4th December) the eminent philologist Andrew Breeze gave a lecture to the Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries at their headquarters in London. His main topic was the battle of Brunanburh, fought in 937, one of the most famous events of the Viking Age. The victor was the English king Athelstan who thwarted an alliance of Norsemen, Scots and Strathclyde Britons. Frustratingly, the site of this mighty clash of arms is unknown. Some historians think it took place on the Wirral Peninsula in Cheshire, near the present-day village of Bromborough. Others think Cheshire is too far south and instead suggest alternative locations, one of these being the River Browney in County Durham. Professor Breeze believes that the Roman fort of Lanchester, slightly north of the Browney, may be the lost ‘fort of Bruna’ implied by the Old English place-name Brunanburh.

The lecture is now available on YouTube. Although I’m not convinced by the Lanchester theory, I like to keep up with the Brunanburh debate so I enjoyed watching the video. At the heart of Professor Breeze’s argument is his belief that the Norsemen sailed in via the Humber estuary – as indeed the twelfth-century chronicler John of Worcester said they did – before mooring their ships and marching to the battlefield. Not everyone is happy to accept the chronicler’s words on this important logistical point. Some sceptical folk (myself included) think it more likely that the Norse commander Anlaf Guthfrithsson brought his army across the Irish Sea to a landfall on the western coast of Britain. The earliest source for the battle of Brunanburh is a tenth-century poem which says that Anlaf fled across the sea to Dublin after his defeat. I support the theory that he probably arrived at the battlefield via the same western route rather than by sailing all the way around Scotland to come down to the Humber.

The link below will take you to the video of the lecture. Look out for a glimpse of my latest book Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age. Needless to say, Professor Breeze isn’t convinced by what I’ve written in the book’s fifth chapter, which mostly deals with the Brunanburh debate. There I suggest that the great battle may have been fought in North Lancashire, although I conclude that the true location is likely to remain elusive for the foreseeable future.

Society of Antiquaries [YouTube] – Brunanburh in 937: Bromborough or Lanchester?

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Notes

I am grateful to Andrew Breeze for telling me about the lecture and video.

A brief summary of the lecture can be seen at the Society of Antiquaries events pages.

I mentioned both Lanchester and Bromborough in a blogpost published here last October.

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More on the Dumfriesshire hoard

The Searcher Dec 2014
Derek McLennan recently sent me a copy of the December issue of The Searcher which has an article on his discovery of the hoard. The Searcher is a magazine for the metal-detecting community and hadn’t popped up on my radar before. I found it very interesting nonetheless, not least because many of the articles move beyond the technical aspects of the hobby to discuss broader archaeological and historical themes.

The article on the hoard gives a detailed account of how Derek found it in a Dumfriesshire field. The story makes an exciting tale, from the first glint of a silver arm-ring to the realisation that the ring was only one of many treasures buried in the ground. Accompanying photographs include fine images of a gold pin in the shape of a bird, a cross with the four Evangelists depicted on its arms and a lidded vessel or ‘Carolingian pot’. The vessel is regarded as a particularly fascinating object and has already attracted much attention. CT scans taken at a hospital have revealed that it contains more than 20 smaller items. It appears on the front cover of The Searcher (see above).

A couple of links to add to the ones listed in previous blogposts…

A peek inside a Viking piggybank (via Mail Online)

Revealing the cross (via Beyond The Beep)

…and a reminder of where to get the latest news on the hoard:
Beyond The Beep (Derek McLennan & Sharon McKee) on Facebook and Twitter

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Dumfriesshire Viking Hoard – update

This is a follow-up to a blogpost from last month, in which I wrote about the discovery of a major hoard of Viking treasure in South West Scotland.

Among the items is a small Carolingian (Frankish) pot with its lid still in place. This fascinating object was CT scanned earlier this week, to give the archaeologists an idea of what it contains. Only after this kind of preliminary investigation will the pot be opened and emptied so that its contents can be examined individually.

I am grateful to metal detectorist Derek McLennan, who discovered the hoard, for pointing me to a video uploaded by Historic Scotland yesterday. It shows the pot being scanned at Borders General Hospital in Melrose. The results can be seen on the video and also at the ‘Beyond the Beep’ Facebook page run by Derek and his partner Sharon.

The hoard is of such significance that many folk are eagerly awaiting further news. In the meantime, look out for updates from the archaeologists and other specialists who are currently examining the objects. A good way of keeping track of what’s happening is to follow Derek and Sharon on Facebook or Twitter (see links below).

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Historic Scotland – Scanning the Viking Hoard (video)

‘Beyond the Beep’ (Derek McLennan & Sharon McKee) on Facebook and Twitter

Facebook page for Treasure Trove in Scotland

Wikipedia page for the Dumfriesshire Hoard

My blogpost from October – Viking treasure found in Dumfriesshire

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New book on the Viking period

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age

My fifth book on early medieval Scotland was published this week.

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age traces the history of relations between the Cumbri or North Britons and their English neighbours through the eighth to eleventh centuries AD. It looks at the wars, treaties and other high-level dealings that characterised this volatile relationship. Woven into the story are the policies and ambitions of other powers, most notably the Scots and Vikings, with whom both the North Britons and Anglo-Saxons were variously in alliance or at war.

As well as presenting a narrative history of the kingdom of Strathclyde, this book also discusses the names ‘Cumbria’ and ‘Cumberland’, both of which now refer to parts of north-west England. The origins of these names, and their meanings to people who lived in Viking-Age Britain, are examined and explained.

The book’s main contents are as follows:

Chapter 1 – Cumbrians and Anglo-Saxons
A discussion of terminology and sources.

Chapter 2 – Early Contacts
Relations between the Clyde Britons and the English in pre-Viking times (sixth to eighth centuries AD).

Chapter 3 – Raiders and Settlers
The arrival of the Vikings in northern Britain, the destruction of Alt Clut and the beginning of the kingdom of Strathclyde or Cumbria.

Chapter 4 – Strathclyde and Wessex
Contacts between the ‘kings of the Cumbrians’ and the family of Alfred the Great.

Chapter 5 – Athelstan
The period 924 to 939 in which the ambitions of a powerful English king clashed with those of his Celtic and Scandinavian neighbours. Includes a discussion of the Battle of Brunanburh.

Chapter 6 – King Dunmail
The reign of Dyfnwal, king of Strathclyde (c.940-970) and the English invasion of ‘Cumberland’ in 945.

Chapter 7 – The Late Tenth Century
Strathclyde’s relations with the kings of England in the last decades of the first millennium.

Chapter 8 – Borderlands
The earls of Bamburgh and their dealings with the kings of Alba and Strathclyde. Includes a discussion of the Battle of Carham (1018).

Chapter 9 – The Fall of Strathclyde
The shadowy period around the mid-eleventh century when the last kingdom of the North Britons was finally conquered.

Chapter 10 – The Anglo-Norman Period
Anglo-Scottish relations in the early twelfth century and the origin of the English county of Cumberland.

Chapter 11 – Conclusions

Notes for each chapter direct the reader to a bibliography of primary and secondary sources. Illustrations include maps, photographs and genealogical tables.

Published by Birlinn of Edinburgh, under the John Donald imprint, and available from Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

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Viking treasure found in Dumfriesshire

Funeral of a Viking Warrior

Funeral of a Viking Warrior by Charles Ernest Butler (1864-1933)

This story will already be old news to some readers of this blog, having been well-reported on social media in recent weeks. But it’s an important item, so I’ll give it a quick mention here.

Last month, a metal detectorist found a hoard of treasure in a Dumfriesshire field. Among the 100+ objects of silver and gold were brooches, armbands, a decorated cross and a Frankish pot. The hoard was buried in the ninth or tenth century and has been provisionally linked to the Vikings. Whatever its origin, it is certainly a major discovery. The objects are currently being examined by specialists, from whom we’ll learn more about dates and historical contexts. It will be interesting to see what discussions emerge on the interaction between Scandinavian and other cultural groups on the northern side of the Solway Firth. Vikings were certainly a major presence in Galloway, where they established a power-base, but how far their influence extended eastward into Dumfriesshire is still uncertain. Perhaps this newly discovered hoard will shed further light on the matter?

The precise location has not been disclosed, for obvious reasons.

Check out the links below, which are just a random selection from the news reports currently circulating online…

Viking treasure haul unearthed in Scotland
Largest ever Viking treasure trove discovered by metal detectorists in Scotland
‘Significant’ Viking treasure found in Dumfries and Galloway
Facebook: Treasure Trove in Scotland

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In the pipeline

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age
Six weeks ago I mentioned my latest book, the writing of which reduced my blogging output to a trickle in the first half of 2014. Well, the thing is now being prepared for printing and will soon emerge from Edinburgh as a bright new paperback.

This is the only one of my books to have its own website, which has now been up-and-running since the middle of August. The image above – a preview of the finished product – was posted there earlier today.

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age (WordPress blog)

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