My Books

The Makers of Scotland: Picts, Romans, Gaels and Vikings

The Makers of Scotland: Picts, Romans, Gaels & Vikings. Available from Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

For more information about this book click here.

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The Picts: A History
‘a valuable resource’ – Jessie Denholm (Scottish Genealogist, September 2011)

The Picts: a History (revised edition, 2010). Available from Amazon UK and Amazon USA

For more information about this book click here.

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The Men of the North
‘….. a textbook and a very useful one, addressing a real gap in the market.’ Martin Carver (Antiquity, December 2011)
‘….. impressive breadth of coverage and clarity of expression.’ Philip Dunshea (The Historian, Summer 2012)

The Men of the North: the Britons of Southern Scotland. Available from Amazon UK and Amazon USA

For more information about this book click here.

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Columba

Columba. Available from Amazon UK and Amazon USA

For more information about this book click here.

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Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age

Strathclyde and the Anglo-Saxons in the Viking Age.

To be published by Birlinn Books in October 2014. It will be available from Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

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5 comments on “My Books

  1. Howard says:

    Tim,
    I’m in the throes of reading your book The Men of the North and enjoying it immensely.
    One observation I’ve made is the difference between the Scots/Irish Gaelic and Welsh. (Please bear in mind this is very new to me and I’m very much at the bottom of a very steep learning curve)
    I always thought that Irish and Scottish Gaelic were the same language as Welsh, Breton, Cornish, and Cumbrian etc…
    This was reinforced by a native speaking Gaelic friend of mine from Carloway on the Isle of Lewis, who, on a visit to Wales, was amazed to find she could understand what the native Welsh speakers were saying. She found that she could communicate with them in her native tongue. However she did say that there was no way she could read the written Welsh language.
    So is the main difference only the written form of the language and the oral differences merely accent/dialect?
    Howard.

  2. Tim says:

    Howard,
    I’m no linguist, so I can’t give you a definitive answer, but the Gaelic and Brittonic language groups are generally regarded as distinct. Although they ultimately have a common origin, and even today seem to share some mutual intelligibility, they are sufficiently different from one another to be treated separately (e.g., as separate modules in university undergraduate courses). It’s interesting about your friend from Carloway. When I visited Lewis twenty years ago, the accents of some native Gaelic-speakers when they spoke English sounded vaguely ‘Welsh’ to my ears.
    I’m pleased to hear you’re enjoying the book!

  3. Fliss says:

    Pleased to see you’re published after all these years!

  4. Tim says:

    Thank you, Fliss. I seem to have been scribbling away on the ‘Dark Ages’ for a long, long time – probably since our first visit to Arthuret in c.1988.

  5. Fliss says:

    It is a long time! I’m glad your enthusiasm and dedication have paid off – you were always in your element with the subject.

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