The Arthurlie Cross

The Arthurlie Cross

(Photo © B Keeling)


Some examples of Pictish sculpture are off the beaten track and not always easy to get to, especially if sited on agricultural land or at a considerable distance from a road. This doesn’t seem to be an issue with the carved stones of Strathclyde which are generally quite accessible, even though none are signposted. They are, of course, far fewer in number than the Pictish stones, and are confined within a much smaller area. I should add that I’m referring here to stones displayed outside rather than those in museums or churches, and I’m excluding items hidden away in storage (such as the Stanely Cross fragment).

Two of the most striking Strathclyde monuments can be found just off major highways running out from the south side of Glasgow. One is the still-complete Netherton Cross, now standing in the grounds of the new parish church in the centre of Hamilton. The other is the headless cross-shaft at Arthurlie, near a road-junction in a residential area of Barrhead.

I’ve recently written a brief post on the Arthurlie Cross at my other blog Heart Of The Kingdom (see link below). The cross-shaft is a fine example of early medieval Celtic sculpture, with well-preserved carvings on three sides. As well as being in an urban setting which makes visiting easy, it is also the only monument of the Strathclyde Britons clearly visible on Google Street View.

Heart Of The Kingdom – The Arthurlie Cross

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