Book news

The Makers of Scotland: Picts, Romans, Gaels and Vikings
Birlinn Books of Edinburgh, the publishers of my books, have now transferred The Picts and The Makers Of Scotland to their main imprint. Both originally appeared under the John Donald subsidiary imprint, which is where Birlinn tend to place most of their scholarly non-fiction titles. My two academic books – The Men Of The North and Columba – will remain at John Donald.

The move has necessitated a format change for Picts and Makers, with both being slightly reduced in size. In the case of Makers, the contents have not been altered, except for tidying up a couple of stray typos. I have, however, made a small change to one part of Picts (in the chapter on Brude, son of Maelchon) to bring it into line with what I’ve written more recently in Columba. Those of you with copies of the original book can pick up the amendment at the end of this post.

Makers has a minor change to the front cover (see image above). The warrior is now looking out from the book rather than gazing over to the right. At the moment, Amazon UK seem to have both versions in stock, which means people have a choice between the original John Donald book (with the warrior’s face in profile) and the slightly smaller reprint (which is cheaper by a few pounds). This will last until copies of the original version run out.

The new versions of both books are available in paper and digital formats. Here are the paperback links on Amazon UK:

The Makers Of Scotland: Picts, Romans, Gaels & Vikings

The Picts: a history

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(A note on the 2013 reprint of Picts)

Tim Clarkson, The Picts: a history (Birlinn). Amendment to the 2010 edition, page 80: new final paragraph in the section ‘Columba and the Picts’.

–> What was Brude likely to gain by allowing a delegation from Iona to enter the heart of his realm? The answer probably lies in an awareness that the old gods of Pictavia now had little to offer. In every corner of the British Isles, paganism was retreating in the face of a sophisticated international religion whose leaders were rapidly gaining influence at the centres of political power. By contrast, the cults of the old gods operated in local contexts which must have seemed small and petty by comparison. To a wise and ambitious king such as Brude, the eventual triumph of Christianity may have seemed inevitable. To a hagiographer like Adomnán, the conflict between the old religion and the new required a more dramatic image. It was presented in the Vita as a face-to-face confrontation between Columba and the high priests of Pictish paganism. These ‘wizards’ or druids were trounced by a few spectacular miracles which proved the superiority of the Christian God. The chief druid was Broichan, Brude’s own foster-father, who continued to resent Columba even after the saint miraculously saved him from death. Broichan’s antipathy was not shared by Brude, for the monks were granted permission to preach throughout the kingdom, and some Picts received Christian baptism from Columba. The actual number of converts is unknown, but Adomnán gives no indication that Brude himself was among them. The king may have remained a pagan to the end of his days, perhaps as a matter of personal choice, or to maintain the goodwill of those among the Pictish elite who felt little enthusiasm for change.

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5 comments on “Book news

  1. Interesting. (passage and the changes in publication)
    The warrior now engages the person holding the book – that may be wise. Funny how little details make a difference.
    Congrats on the move!

  2. William Rock says:

    This made me think about Brude/Bridei again. I read your book on Columba and enjoyed it but haven’t made it to your other books yet, so I may be showing my naivety here. Why has Tomnahurich in Inverness never been proposed as a candidate for Bridei’s stronghold? Obviously it, like the Inverness Castle site, couldn’t be excavated now.

    • Tim says:

      In my book on the Picts I’ve mentioned Torvean as a possible candidate near Inverness, but it’s strange that Tomnahurich hasn’t been suggested. Like many sites of similar appearance it looks as if a Dark Age hillfort ought to be somewhere on the top (assuming the fairies granted permission).

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