Picts at Moncrieffe Hill

Moncrieffe Hill Pictish fort
A new project to promote the history and archaeology of the Carse of Gowrie is set to run for the next four years, with funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and other sources. One of the key sites involved in the project is Moncrieffe Hill which has a large Iron Age fort on the summit. The fort has never been excavated before, but the new project will see the first ever ‘dig’. This is likely to shed light on how the hill was used by the ancient inhabitants of Perthshire, not only in the Iron Age but in the Pictish period that followed.

The name Moncrieffe is an Anglicised form of Monadh Craoibh (Gaelic: ‘Hill of Trees’). A glance at the Latin text of the Annals of Ulster turns up an interesting item from the year 728:

Bellum Mónidchroibh inter Pictores inuicem, ubi Oenghus uictor fuit & multi ex parte Eilpini regis perempti sunt. Bellum lacrimabile inter eosdem gestum est iuxta Castellum Credi, ubi Elpinus efugit.

‘The battle of Monadh Craoibh between the Picts themselves, in which Óengus was victor, and many were slain on the side of king Alpín. A woeful battle was fought between the same parties near Castle Credi, where Alpín was put to flight.’

Castle Credi is unidentifed, but Monadh Craoibh is undoubtedly Moncrieffe Hill. The context of the battle was a power-struggle between rival claimants for kingship in southern Pictland. Four ambitious men – Óengus, Alpín, Nechtan and Drust – fought a bitter war that lasted through the 720s. By the summer of 729, a victor finally emerged in the shape of Óengus, who defeated Nechtan, his last remaining rival, on 12 August. In the previous year, Óengus had trounced Alpín’s forces at Moncrieffe Hill and Castle Credi.

Moncrieffe Hill Pictish fort
Óengus (pronounced ‘Oyn-yus’) went on to become one of the greatest of all Pictish kings. In the 730s he conquered Dál Riata, the land of the Scots, which thereafter seems to have lain under permanent Pictish overkingship. One result of the long period of Pictish supremacy was the gradual merging together of the Scots and Picts as a single, Gaelic-speaking people inhabiting a new kingdom called Alba. If we credit Óengus as one of the main architects of this process, his victory at Moncrieffe Hill should perhaps be seen as an important milestone in the birth of the Scottish nation.

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I deal with the Pictish dynastic war of the 720s in my book The Picts: a History (at pp.150-3).

The image below shows the Israelite king David, as depicted on the eighth-century St Andrews Sarcophagus. It is possible that the stone-carver tried to capture the likeness of Óengus, king of the Picts, who may be the person commemorated by this famous monument.

St Andrews Sarcophagus

The new heritage project for the Carse of Gowrie is described in an article in The Courier. The project also has its own website.

Check out these photos of Moncrieffe Hill in a blogpost by Keith Savage.

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4 comments on “Picts at Moncrieffe Hill

  1. dearieme says:

    “Óengus (pronounced ‘Oyn-yus’)”: och, don’t spoil it. I was perfectly happy to pronounce it “Angus”.

    • Tim says:

      Spelling the name as ‘Angus’ is still ok, as far as I can tell. The form of the name favoured by many historians today is however ‘Onuist’ (or ‘Unust’) which seen is as closer to the original Pictish.

      • dearieme says:

        When I was a laddie, it was held that Pictish perhaps wasn’t P-Celtic, perhaps not even Indo-European. Now people know how to pronounce it. Is there anything so vulgar as evidence, or is this just another case of academic fashions changing?

        • Tim says:

          Evidence does tend to put a dampener on things and has pretty much ended the idea that the Picts were a strange, mysterious people.

          The non-Indo European theory is a bit of a red herring but has become a big part of the aura of mystery surrounding the Picts. In reality, the P-Celtic elements in the place names of Pictland were identified by experts more than a hundred years ago. They soon realised that the people who devised these names must have spoken a P-Celtic language like the ancestor of Welsh. Some names seem to preserve elements of a much older non-Celtic language but the jury is out on whether or not this was Indo-European.

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