Yeavering report online

Yeavering by Brian Hope-Taylor
The full report of the excavations at Yeavering by Brian Hope-Taylor (1923-2001) is available as a free download.

This monumental tome runs well beyond 450 pages and is one of the most frequently cited texts on post-Roman and early Anglo-Saxon Northumbria. Originally published in 1977, it has remained a standard reference tool for researchers working on the history and archaeology of Northeast England and Southeast Scotland in the fifth to seventh centuries. The downloadable version has been made available by English Heritage via the Archaeology Data Service at the University of York.

Yeavering was a major centre of power for the Northumbrian king Edwin (died 633) who established a royal palace there. It was mentioned in the following century by the Venerable Bede, who called it Gefrin – a native Celtic name meaning ‘Hill of Goats’. The hill in question loomed above Edwin’s palace and was formerly used by local Britons who had a fortified settlement on the top. One unusual feature unearthed at the palace by Hope-Taylor’s team was a timber grandstand which accommodated spectators at formal public events. This has long been regarded as one of the most significant archaeological discoveries from Anglo-Saxon Northumbria.

As well as describing the excavations, the report also includes an extensive historical discussion which – nearly 40 years on – is still a valuable source of information on the early kingdoms of the North.

Link Yeavering: an Anglo-British centre of early Northumbria [free download]

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9 comments on “Yeavering report online

  1. Valerie Brewster Willis says:

    Thank you very much for this link. Having just dusted off my Oxford histories and halfway through Stenton’s Anglo-Saxon England, it is wonderful to have Hope-Taylors work to hand as well. Now that I am long-in-the-tooth they read like novels in the context of what you young’uns are turning up. Love it.

  2. Thank you so much for sharing this. I can’t wait to read it!

  3. Yes indeed, thank you!

  4. dearieme says:

    English English doesn’t really have a word equivalent to the Scottish English “swithering”. I think “yeavering” would do very well.

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